Photo of the Week: Winter Sports in Brooklyn

Prospect Park Skiing, circa 1925, v1980.2.61; Prospect Park lantern slide collection, v1980.2; Brooklyn Historical Society.

Prospect Park Skiing, circa 1925, v1980.2.61; Prospect Park lantern slide collection, v1980.2; Brooklyn Historical Society.

The 2018 Winter Olympics are underway! I have been watching in amazement and wonder at all of the incredible athletes, including 19 New Yorkers, competing in the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea. With that in mind, I dug up some photographs of Brooklynites enjoying winter sports. The photo of the week depicts a man skiing in Prospect Park in the mid-1920s.

This photograph comes from the Prospect Park lantern slide collection comprised of 91 lantern slides dating from 1886 to 1929. The slides show Prospect Park from the time of construction to the 1920s and include images of park activities such as group recreation, sports, gatherings; statues and monuments; and horticulture and holiday displays.

Interested in seeing more photos from BHS’s collection? Visit our online image gallery, which includes a selection of our images. Interested in seeing even more historic Brooklyn images? Visit our Brooklyn Visual Heritage website here. To search BHS’s entire collection of images, archives, maps, and special collections visit BHS’s Othmer Library Wed-Sat, 1:00-5:00 p.m. library@brooklynhistory.org

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Photo of the Week: Happy Valentine’s Day

[Elderly couple in Prospect Park], circa 1975, v2008.013.30; Lucille Fornasieri Gold photographs, 2008.013; Brooklyn Historical Society.

[Elderly couple in Prospect Park], circa 1975, v2008.013.30; Lucille Fornasieri Gold photographs, 2008.013; Brooklyn Historical Society.

This week, in honor of Valentine’s Day, we share a photograph that captures a couple’s tender moment in Prospect Park, around 1975. We hope you have a day filled with love and maybe a little too much chocolate.

This photograph comes from the Lucille Fornasieri Gold photographs collection comprised of 93 color and black and white photographs by street photographer, Lucille Fornasieri Gold, taken from 1968 to 2008. The photographs are primarily posed and unposed portraits of people throughout Brooklyn. To see more photographs from this collection, check out this gallery.

Interested in seeing more photos from BHS’s collection? Visit our online image gallery, which includes a selection of our images. Interested in seeing even more historic Brooklyn images? Visit our Brooklyn Visual Heritage website here. To search BHS’s entire collection of images, archives, maps, and special collections visit BHS’s Othmer Library Wed-Sat, 1:00-5:00 p.m. library@brooklynhistory.org

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Flatbush + Main Episode 22: Black Businesses in Brooklyn

In Episode 22 of Brooklyn Historical Society’s podcast Flatbush + Main, co-hosts Zaheer Ali and Julie Golia examine the legacy of black-owned businesses in Brooklyn.

Index
03:13 – Histories and Ideas
22:32 – Into the Archives
38:48 – Voices of Brooklyn

For complete show notes, go to brooklynhistory.org/flatbush-main.

We hope you’re enjoying our podcast! Please subscribe, rate, and review us at brooklynhistory.org/fm-itunes. And share the news of Flatbush + Main far and wide using the hashtag #FlatbushandMain.

Segment 1: Histories and Ideas

In segment 1, Zaheer and Julie sit down with Prithi Kanakamedala to talk about the legacy of one Brooklyn businesswoman, Elizabeth Gloucester, and the ties between politics, activism, and entrepreneurship. Prithi is an Assistant Professor in History at Bronx Community College CUNY. Prior to that she worked at BHS, where she was curator and lead historian on In Pursuit of Freedom, a public partnership of BHS, Weeksville Heritage Center and Irondale Ensemble Project that explored the untold stories of anti-slavery activism in Brooklyn.

Prithi also left us with some great suggestions for further reading. Check out the recently-published work of historians Mary Phillips, Robyn C. Spencer, Keisha N. Blain, and LaShawn Harris.

Segment 2: Into the Archives

Julie and Zaheer get excited while analyzing the most interesting business document they’ve encountered – the Brooklyn Brush Manufacturing Company Articles of Incorporation. You can examine the document in person in our archives – here’s the finding aid. In the meantime, here are images of the document.

Segment 3: Voices of Brooklyn

Zaheer and Julie listen to an excerpt from the oral history of Mark Winston Griffith, currently the Executive Director of Brooklyn Movement Center. In 1991, Griffith co-founded with Errol Louis the Central Brooklyn Federal Credit Union, which would become the largest community-based financial cooperative in the country.

You can listen to the full interview on BHS’s Oral History Portal here.

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Photo of the Week: Eberhard Faber Pencil Company Collection

[Eberhard Faber boxing and labelling department], circa 1920, v1988.35.2;Eberhard Faber Pencil Company collection, ARC.028; Brooklyn Historical Society.

[Eberhard Faber boxing and labelling department], circa 1920, v1988.35.2;Eberhard Faber Pencil Company collection, ARC.028; Brooklyn Historical Society.

The photo of the week depicts employees in the Eberhard Faber Pencil Company’s boxing and labelling department, around 1920, in the Greenpoint neighborhood of Brooklyn. The company began in Nuremberg, Bavaria (now Germany) in 1761 when Casper Faber began manufacturing and marketing pencils in his village of Stein. The business continued to grow and expand through many generations of Fabers, eventually moving to NYC to open the subsidiary branch of A.W. Faber Company in 1849.

In 1861, the company opened its first U.S. pencil factory on East 42nd Street, on what is now the present day location of the United Nations. After a fire destroyed the factory in 1872, the company moved to the Greenpoint neighborhood of Brooklyn. The factory grew to envelop two square city blocks bounded by Greenpoint Avenue, West Street, Java Street, and Franklin Street. The factory remained in Greenpoint until 1956 when it moved its operations and headquarters to Wilkes-Barre, PA.

The photo of the week is from the Eberhard Faber Pencil Company collection comprised of materials relating to the Eberhard Faber Pencil Company, including product catalogs, promotional materials, sales manuals, photographs, and publications. To see more photographs from this collection, check out this gallery. And check out this recent story on one of America’s last pencil factories.

Eberhard Faber was also one of the largest employers of women in early 20th-century Brooklyn. Their story, and the story of other factory women, is featured in BHS’s new long-term exhibition, Waterfront, on view at our DUMBO location. Learn more about the exhibition here.

Interested in seeing more photos from BHS’s collection? Visit our online image gallery, which includes a selection of our images. Interested in seeing even more historic Brooklyn images? Visit our Brooklyn Visual Heritage website here. To search BHS’s entire collection of images, archives, maps, and special collections visit BHS’s Othmer Library Wed-Sat, 1:00-5:00 p.m. library@brooklynhistory.org

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Photo of the Week: Harry Kalmus papers and photographs

[Smitty Smith’s baby], circa 1950, v1991.11.106.1; Harry Kalmus papers and photographs, ARC.046; Brooklyn Historical Society.

[Smitty Smith’s baby], circa 1950, v1991.11.106.1; Harry Kalmus papers and photographs, ARC.046; Brooklyn Historical Society.

The strength of Brooklyn Historical Society’s photographic collections is the built environment, including photographs of buildings and homes that document nearly every Brooklyn neighborhood’s street grid. Not to be overlooked, however, are the collections that focus on Brooklyn’s diverse and active population. This photo of the week from the Harry Kalmus papers and photographs collection depicts Smitty Smith and his daughter around 1950. Harry Kalmus’s photographs include many scenes like this—happy moments and celebrations such as birthday parties, stick ball games in the street, and trips to Coney Island in 1950s Brooklyn.

This rich collection consists of approximately 13,339 black-and-white negatives, 108 prints, and 186 stereoscopic slides from Kalmus’s personal and professional photography work. Kalmus grew up on Vermont Street in the East New York neighborhood of Brooklyn. After serving in World War II, he returned to Brooklyn and began his career as a professional photographer. He worked for advertising agencies, as well as an event photographer, photographing weddings and bar mitzvahs in Brooklyn. This collection is not digitized, but we would love for you to visit the collection in person during Othmer Library’s public research hours.

Interested in seeing more photos from BHS’s collection? Visit our online image gallery, which includes a selection of our images. Interested in seeing even more historic Brooklyn images? Visit our Brooklyn Visual Heritage website here. To search BHS’s entire collection of images, archives, maps, and special collections visit BHS’s Othmer Library Wed-Sat, 1:00-5:00 p.m. library@brooklynhistory.org

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