Early Views of Prospect Park

Tupper Thomas announced her retirement as administrator of Prospect Park just as we were beginning a project to catalog our 19th Century map collection. The collection includes a number of maps covering the progress of Prospect Park from early proposals to today. In honor of both Ms Thomas and the beautiful park she has worked to preserve, here are a few interesting pieces:

An early plan by Egbert Viele. Note Flatbush Avenue cutting directly through the middle of the park. Land was purchased based on Viele’s plan, but plans changed as time passed and the park ended up looking very different.

Plan for the Improvement of Prospect Park. 1861. Egbert L. Viele. Brooklyn Historical Society Map Collection.

Plan for the Improvement of Prospect Park. Egbert L. Viele. 1861. Brooklyn Historical Society Map Collection.

Another proposal that didn’t advance beyond paper – this one by Benjamin Frost.

Preliminary Map Showing Lineal and Topographical Surveys of Prospect Park Brooklyn, Over Areas Included by Present and Proposed Boundaries. Benjamin D. Frost. 1865. Brooklyn Historical Society Map Collection.

Preliminary Map Showing Lineal and Topographical Surveys of Prospect Park Brooklyn, Over Areas Included by Present and Proposed Boundaries. Benjamin D. Frost. 1865. Brooklyn Historical Society Map Collection.

An 1865 plan by Calvert Vaux before his partnership with Frederick Law Olmsted.  You can see existing roads running “under” what today is part of the long meadow. Also note the prototype at right for Grand Army Plaza.

Plan Showing Present & Proposed Boundaries of Prospect Park Brooklyn. Calvert Vaux, Architect. Brooklyn Historical Society Collection.

Plan Showing Present & Proposed Boundaries of Prospect Park, Brooklyn. Calvert Vaux, Architect. 1865. Brooklyn Historical Society Map Collection.

An 1871 design from Olmsted, Vaux & Co, Landscape Architects.  Made while the park was both open and still under construction, this map includes a reservoir near Grand Army Plaza. Today the central branch of the Brooklyn Public Library and Mount Prospect Park sit on what was the reservoir’s land. Also of interest is the land for sale around the reservoir; part of it makes up today’s Brooklyn Botanic Gardens.

Design for Prospect Park in the city of Brooklyn. Olmsted Vaux & Co., Landscape Architects. Brooklyn Historical Society Collection.

Design for Prospect Park in the city of Brooklyn. Olmsted Vaux & Co., Landscape Architects. 1871. Brooklyn Historical Society Map Collection.

This entry was posted in Brooklyn Past & Present, Hidden Collections and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

9 Responses to Early Views of Prospect Park

  1. April Fool Day Pranks
    we all are fool
    happy April fool day to all

  2. thanks for sharing this article I am very Happy to here

  3. amazing easter wishes and quotes for you only on this
    Happy Easter 2017!!!

  4. You ought to be a part of a contest for one of the finest sites on the internet. I will recommend this web site!

  5. WhatsUply says:

    Great The installer documents is offered in two variations, offline and also online as well as if you do not have a very strong web connection; it is better that you utilize the offline version to stay clear of the installment errors Fine.

  6. good such as streaming, casual gaming and also lots of others. This full Kodi setup guide puts together numerous tutorials nice.

  7. showbox is an app gives you mind blowing movies download experience because of its user friendly interface with showbox apk you can download all kind of latest movies at just few clicks. Nowadays showbox is an app which is must for every movie lover and lots of youngsters access this one the most trendy app and get entertain.

  8. showbox apk says:

    Nowadays movies download is not a big task for anyone lots of movies streaming app is available with full of upgrade features but the question is which one is better so after lots of searches i personally prefer showbox because of its latest collection and movies quality.

  9. Matthew says:

    I shudder to think of the park bisected by Flatbush Ave. Poor old Egbert, missed out both here and in Central. But his water course map of Manhattan was a work for the ages; supposedly it is still consulted for the buried but undead streams of Mannahatta. Ghost waters. I wonder if there is anything similar for Brooklyn?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *