Photo of the Week: Brooklyn Bar

[Men inside Bar], ca 1900, v1972.1.1063, Early Brooklyn and Long Island photograph collection, ARC.201; Brooklyn Historical Society.

[Men inside Bar], ca 1900, v1972.1.1063, Early Brooklyn and Long Island photograph collection, ARC.201; Brooklyn Historical Society.

If you made it to the Oktoberfest-themed Free Friday event here at BHS, you may have seen this photograph among other beer-related collections items. I find this photograph particularly charming because it offers a glimpse into the bar customer and décor in turn of the century Brooklyn. I love the landscape images depicted behind the bar, the barkeeper’s clothing, and the wood details. Today, many Brooklyn bars make aesthetic reference to this saloon tradition.

If you look behind the men standing in the photograph, there are also political advertisements. What sticks out to you about this fascinating photograph?

This photograph was taken sometime around 1900. The handwritten note on the back of the photograph indicates the man behind the bar is named Charles Schindler and he lived at 311 Devoe Street in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn.

This photograph comes from the Early Brooklyn and Long Island photograph collection which comprises roughly 1,400 black-and-white photographs taken by various photographers from around 1860 to 1920. The majority of the photographs in this collection depict the built environment (homes, churches, ferry terminals, etc.) and the natural environment (beaches, trees, ponds, etc.). To see more photographs from this collection, check out this gallery. Don’t miss the next Free Friday event coming up on November 11!

Interested in seeing more photos from BHS’s collection? Visit our online image gallery, which includes a selection of our images. Interested in seeing even more historic Brooklyn images? Visit our Brooklyn Visual Heritage website here. To search BHS’s entire collection of images, archives, maps, and special collections visit BHS’s Othmer Library Wed-Sat, 1:00-5:00 p.m. library@brooklynhistory.org

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Flatbush + Main Episode 07: Brooklyn’s Women Politicians

In less than a week, Americans will go to the polls to choose a new president – and for the first time, one of the major party candidates is a woman. In episode 07 of Brooklyn Historical Society’s podcast Flatbush + Main, co-hosts Zaheer Ali and Julie Golia consider the important legacies left by several of Brooklyn’s female politicians, and the intersectional nature of gender and politics in this incredibly diverse borough. They learn about the remarkable career of Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm from historian Zinga Fraser, and draw connections between Chisholm’s politics and today’s political landscape. In their explorations of the papers of NAACP staffer Richetta Randolph, they expand definitions of what constitutes political work. In “Voices of Brooklyn,” they listen to influential activist Elsie Richardson describe her interactions with Robert Kennedy during his 1965 visit to the Brooklyn neighborhood of Bedford Stuyvesant. Finally, they welcome BHS Manager of Teacher and Learning Alex Tronolone, who plugs BHS’s Election Day Professional Development programming for New York City’s K-12 teachers.

For complete show notes, go to brooklynhistory.org/flatbush-main.

Index

02:43 – Histories and Ideas: Interview with Zinga Fraser about Shirley Chisholm
20:12 – Into the Archives: NAACP staffer Richetta Randolph Wallace papers
32:45 – Voices of Brooklyn: Activist Elsie Richardson
45:45 – BHS’s Election Day Professional Development Program for Teachers

Segment 1: Histories and Ideas

After speaking with Zinga Fraser about Shirley Chisholm, we declared the interview nothing short of brilliant. We know you’ll think so too.

Zaheer, Zinga, and Julie

Zinga is Assistant Professor of Africana Studies at Brooklyn College and directs the Shirley Chisholm Project of Brooklyn Women’s Activism.

The scholarship on intersectionality is vast and excellent. Here are but a few suggestions: Kimberle Crenshaw’s 1989 article, “Demarginalizing the Intersection of Race
and Sex: A Black Feminist Critique of Antidiscrimination Doctrine, Feminist Theory and Antiracist Politics”; Elsa Barkley Brown, “‘What has happened here’: The Politics of Difference in Women’s History and Feminist Politics,” Feminist Studies, 18, 2 (Summer 1992), 295-312; and of course, bell hooks, Ain’t I A Woman: Black Women and Feminism (1981).

Segment 2: Into the Archives

We discussed the Richetta Randolph Wallace papers (Collection #: 1978.137). The letters we analyze are part of Series 2, Correspondence. Wallace was her married name, but she retained use of her maiden name in her professional work, so we followed her lead and referred to her as Randolph.

Here are images of the letters:

There has been some very good recent scholarship on the NAACP. Take a look at Patricia Sullivan’s Lift Every Voice: The NAACP and the Making of the Civil Rights Movement and Carol Anderson’s Bourgeois Radicals: The NAACP and the Struggle for Colonial Liberation, 1941-1960

In the segment, Zaheer also recommends Jeanne Theoharis’s The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks.

Segment 3: Voices of Brooklyn

Elsie Richardson was a community organizer and activist who fought for equity in housing, employment, government, and much more. Her career spanned over a half century. Her interview is from the Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation oral history collection, which was created when Brooklyn Historical Society and and Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation partnered in 2007-2008 to celebrate the 40th anniversary of Restoration’s founding as the first community development corporation (CDC) in the United States. The interview is being made available, thanks to a grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) of the National Archives and Records Administration.

Below is the full interview with Elsie Richardson:

When she passed away in 2012, historian Mike Woodsworth wrote this homage to Richardson in The Nation.

Segment 4: Endorsements

BHS Manager of Teaching and Learning Alex Tronolone joined Julie and Zaheer to plug BHS’s day-long Professional Development Workshops on Election Day, November 8, 2016. Teachers can sign up here.

Zaheer endorsed BHS’s screeining of Los Sures on November 1, 2016 at 6:30 pm. This event is free; it may sell out, so sign up here!

Alex endorsed “The Darker Side of Reproductive History,” moderated by MSNBC’s Irin Carmon and featuring panelists Linda Gordon (Woman’s Body, Woman’s Right: The History of Birth Control in America), Adam Cohen (Imbeciles: The Supreme Court, American Eugenics, and the Sterilization of Carrie Buck), Iris Lopez, (Matters of Choice: Puerto Rican Women’s Struggle for Reproductive Freedom), and Jessica Gonzalez-Rojas, (Executive Director of the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health). The event is Thursday, November 10, 2016 at 7 pm; tickets are $10/$5 for members – sign up here.

Julie endorsed “In Conversation: Claudia Rankine and Alondra Nelson.” The event is Wednesday, November 16, 2016 at 6:30 pm. It’s free – get your tickets here.

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Photo of the Week: Brooklyn Heights Promenade

[Manhattan skyline at night], ca 1964, V1988.1.147, Edna Glyde photograph collection, V1988.1; Brooklyn Historical Society.

[Manhattan skyline at night], ca 1964, V1988.1.147, Edna Glyde photograph collection, V1988.1; Brooklyn Historical Society.

The breathtaking view of the Manhattan skyline from the Brooklyn Heights Promenade never ceases to amaze me. At BHS, we’re lucky to be able to experience the views from the Promenade regularly, as it’s only a few blocks away from our office in the Brooklyn Heights neighborhood of Brooklyn. I love this photograph of the skyline at night, taken by Edna Glyde around 1964.

The unique tone of this photograph (specifically the rich blue tones) is typical of the Ektachrome film Glyde used to make it. Ektachrome was a Kodak brand of film that was introduced in the 1940s and discontinued in 2009. Another reason it was unique was because, unlike Kodachrome (a popular transparency film), amateurs could process this film in their own darkrooms.

This photograph comes from the Edna Glyde photography collection that comprises 197 photographs by Glyde, taken from 1940 to 1967. Glyde was a resident of Willow Street in the Brooklyn Heights neighborhood of Brooklyn. Many of her photographs depict street scenes throughout the neighborhood. To learn more about the history of the Promenade, check out the Brooklyn Waterfront History website.

Interested in seeing more photos from BHS’s collection? Visit our online image gallery, which includes a selection of our images. Interested in seeing even more historic Brooklyn images? Visit our Brooklyn Visual Heritage website here. To search BHS’s entire collection of images, archives, maps, and special collections visit BHS’s Othmer Library Wed-Sat, 1:00-5:00 p.m. library@brooklynhistory.org

 

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Photo of the Week: Burton Sisters

[Portrait of three women], ca 1885, v1981.283.48, Burton family paper and photographs, ARC.217; Brooklyn Historical Society.

[Portrait of three women], ca 1885, v1981.283.48, Burton family paper and photographs, ARC.217; Brooklyn Historical Society.

I love this tintype photograph of sisters Minnie Burton and Virginia Burton with their sister-in-law (presumably Josie Newcombe) seated with arms interlocked, identical outfits, and fierce expressions. This photograph was taken around 1885 by an unknown photographer, but likely at a studio in Brooklyn.

The Burton family included William H. Burton, a house painter, and his wife Virginia Baptista, both immigrants who created a home at 436 Lafayette Avenue in what is now considered the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn. They had five children: Percival, Virginia E., Minnie, Charles, and Sidney. This photograph is from the Burton family papers and photographs collection that comprises manuscript materials such as bonds, deeds, mortgages, family correspondence, school ephemera, account books, and driver’s licenses. This collection also includes 189 photographic items of the Burton Family. To see more photographs from this collection, see this gallery.

Interested in seeing more photos from BHS’s collection? Visit our online image gallery, which includes a selection of our images. Interested in seeing even more historic Brooklyn images? Visit our Brooklyn Visual Heritage website here. To search BHS’s entire collection of images, archives, maps, and special collections visit BHS’s Othmer Library Wed-Sat, 1:00-5:00 p.m. library@brooklynhistory.org

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Photo of the Week: Scrapbooks

Autumn Scene Near 3rd St., ca 1900, V1986.250.1.73, William Schroeder, Sr. scrapbook collection , ARC.121; Brooklyn Historical Society.

Autumn Scene Near 3rd St., ca 1900, V1986.250.1.73, William Schroeder, Sr. scrapbook collection , ARC.121; Brooklyn Historical Society.

The photo of the week is titled “Autumn scene near 3rd street” and depicts a view of Prospect Park around 1900, in the Park Slope neighborhood of Brooklyn. This photograph comes from the William Schroeder, Sr. scrapbook collection that comprises three scrapbooks created by Brooklyn physician, Dr. William Schroeder, Sr., from around 1900 through 1904. This photograph is part of the “Parks of Brooklyn, N.Y.” scrapbook that contains maps, prints, and photographs of Brooklyn parks, particularly Prospect Park, taken by a number of photographers.

Brooklyn Historical Society has hundreds of personal and corporate scrapbooks in its collections. Personally, I think it’s fascinating to look at a scrapbook because they often include photographs, ephemera, newspaper clippings, and other items that are carefully placed in a particular sequence and context by the creator. You can learn a lot about an individual or group of people based on what is placed in a scrapbook. We’d love for you to visit the Othmer Library during public research hours to see one for yourself!

Interested in seeing more photos from BHS’s collection? Visit our online image gallery, which includes a selection of our images. Interested in seeing even more historic Brooklyn images? Visit our Brooklyn Visual Heritage website here. To search BHS’s entire collection of images, archives, maps, and special collections visit BHS’s Othmer Library Wed-Sat, 1:00-5:00 p.m. library@brooklynhistory.org

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