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Events
20
October Sunday

Screening and Discussion: Traces of the Trade: A Story from the Deep North

Overview

Presented as a part of the series 400 Years of Inequality: Slavery, Race, and Our Unresolved History.

“What no one in my family realized was that the DeWolfs were the largest slave-trading family in US history… they brought over 10,000 Africans to the Americas in chains.” – Katrina Browne, Traces of the Trade

When filmmaker Katrina Browne discovers that her New England ancestors were the largest slave-trading family in US history, she and nine cousins retrace the Triangle Trade and gain powerful new perspectives on the black/white divide. Browne, who testified in June at the House Judiciary Committee hearing on reparations, will discuss issues of racism today following the screening.

This program is presented as part of Brooklyn Historical Society’s 400 Years of Inequality: Slavery, Race, and Our Unresolved History initiative, an immersive series of reflection, analysis, and discussion acknowledging our nation’s unresolved history of slavery.

Detail

Sunday, October 20, 2019

4:00 pm

Admission

  • General Admission $10
  • Member Admission $5
reserve tickets

Missed this program? Listen to it here!

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Conversation Catalyst

In the feature documentary Traces of the Trade: A Story from the Deep North, filmmaker Katrina Browne discovers that her New England ancestors were the largest slave-trading family in U.S. history. She and nine cousins retrace the Triangle Trade and gain powerful new perspectives on the black/white divide.

Featuring

  • Oct 20 Katrina Browne

    Katrina Browne

    Katrina Browne, who testified in June 2019 at the House Judiciary Committee Hearing on reparations, has devoted her life to racial dialogue and healing since discovering at age 28 that her ancestors, the DeWolfs of Rhode Island, were the largest slave-trading family in US history.

Thanks to our funders

This series is made possible through the generous support of Joanne Witty and Eugene Keilin, Sylvia and Byron Lewis, Margaret Seiler and Hovey Brock, Alexandra Bowie and Daniel Richman, the Brooklyn Community Foundation, The Scherman Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation President’s Grant Fund of the Princeton Area Community Foundation, and donors to BHS’s Race and History Fund.

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Thanks to our programming partners

BHS is proud to partner with the Brooklyn Community Foundation, Coming to the Table, Facing History and Ourselves, the New School’s 400 Years of Inequality initiative, the Social Science Research Council, and the Vera Institute of Justice.