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400 Years of Inequality: Slavery, Race, and Our Unresolved History

In October of 2019, Brooklyn Historical Society joined institutions from across the country to shine a spotlight on four centuries of our nation’s unresolved legacy of slavery.

In 1619, a ship carrying more than 20 enslaved Africans landed in Jamestown, its human cargo sold into bondage. In this immersive series of reflection, analysis and discussion, BHS explored the ensuing history of slavery in the United States and its ramifications today, 400 years later. With this special series we sought to reframe the telling of America’s story of inequality in order to shape a more complete narrative for the future.

400 Years of Inequality included programs for adults, families, and educators, as well as a featured selection of books in our Gift Shop on Pierrepont Street.

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In 1619, a ship carrying more than 20 enslaved Africans landed in Jamestown, its human cargo sold into bondage. In this immersive series of reflection, analysis and discussion, BHS explored the ensuing history of slavery in the United States and its ramifications today, 400 years later. With this special series we sought to reframe the telling of America’s story of inequality in order to shape a more complete narrative for the future.

400 Years of Inequality included programs for adults, families, and educators, as well as a featured selection of books in our Gift Shop on Pierrepont Street.

Learn about the programs

Thanks to our funders

This series was made possible through the generous support of Joanne Witty and Eugene Keilin.

Additional support was provided by Sylvia and Byron Lewis, Margaret Seiler and Hovey Brock, Alexandra Bowie and Daniel Richman, the Brooklyn Community Foundation, The Scherman Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation President’s Grant Fund of the Princeton Area Community Foundation, and donors to BHS’s Race and History Fund.

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Thanks to our programming partners

BHS proudly partnered with the Brooklyn Community Foundation, Coming to the Table, Facing History and Ourselves, the New School’s 400 Years of Inequality initiative, the Social Science Research Council, and the Vera Institute of Justice.